Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

HIV, the cause of AIDS in humans, is characterized by great genetic heterogeneity. In particular, HIV-1 group M subtypes are responsible for most of the infections worldwide. We investigate the demographic history of HIV-1B and HIV-1C subtypes in South Africa and Brazil using both a parametric and a nonparametric approach based on coalescent theory. Our results show that although both subtypes are spreading exponentially in Brazil, the HIV-1C growth rate is about twice that of Brazilian HIV-1B or South African HIV-1C, providing evidence, for the first time, of a different epidemic potential between two HIV-1 subtypes. The present study not only may have important consequences for devising future vaccination and therapeutic strategies, but also offers additional evidence that skyline plots are indeed a simple and powerful tool for monitoring and predicting the behavior of viral epidemics.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s00239-004-0206-5

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Mol Evol

Publication Date

05/2005

Volume

60

Pages

598 - 605

Keywords

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Demography, Evolution, Molecular, Genetic Variation, HIV-1, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Models, Biological, Models, Genetic, Phylogeny, Population Dynamics, South Africa, South America, Species Specificity