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Attentional bias is a central feature of many cognitive theories of psychopathology. One of the most frequent methods of investigating such bias has been an emotional analog of the Stroop task. In this task, participants name the colors in which words are printed, and the words vary in their relevance to each theme of psychopathology. The authors review research showing that patients are often slower to name the color of a word associated with concerns relevant to their clinical condition. They address the causes and mechanisms underlying the phenomenon, focusing on J.D. Cohen, K. Dunbar, and J.L. McClelland's (1990) parallel distributed processing model.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Psychol Bull

Publication Date

07/1996

Volume

120

Pages

3 - 24

Keywords

Anxiety Disorders, Attention, Color Perception, Depressive Disorder, Emotions, Humans, Psychopathology, Reaction Time, Reading, Semantics