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BACKGROUND: Noninvasive cortical stimulation could represent an add-on treatment to enhance motor recovery after stroke. However, its clinical value, including anticipated size and duration of the treatment effects, remains largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: The authors designed a small semi-randomized clinical trial to explore whether long-lasting clinically important gains can be achieved by adding theta burst stimulation (TBS), a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to a rehabilitation program for the hand. METHODS: A total of 41 chronic stroke patients received excitatory TBS to the ipsilesional hemisphere or inhibitory TBS to the contralesional hemisphere in 2 centers; each active group was compared with a group receiving sham TBS. TBS was followed by physical therapy for 10 working days. Patients and therapists were blinded to the type of TBS. Primary outcome measures (9-hole Peg Test [9HPT], Jebsen Taylor Test [JTT], and grip and pinch-grip dynamometry) were assessed 4, 30, and 90 days post treatment. The clinically important difference was defined as 10% of the maximum score. RESULTS: There were no differences between the active treatment and sham groups in any of the outcome measures. All patients achieved small sustainable improvements--9HPT, 5% of maximum (confidence interval [CI] = 3%-7%); JTT, 5.7% (CI = 3%-8%); and grip strength, 6% (CI = 2%-10%)--all below the defined clinically important level. CONCLUSIONS: Cortical stimulation did not augment the gains from a late rehabilitation program. The effect size anticipated by the authors was overestimated. These results can improve the design of future work on therapeutic uses of TMS.

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/1545968312437940

Type

Journal article

Journal

Neurorehabil Neural Repair

Publication Date

10/2012

Volume

26

Pages

976 - 987

Keywords

Adult, Aged, Analysis of Variance, Female, Hand Strength, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Strength Dynamometer, Pain Measurement, Stroke, Stroke Rehabilitation, Time Factors, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Treatment Outcome, Upper Extremity