Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle and wildlife. Direct aerosol contact is thought to be the primary route of infection between conspecifics, whereas indirect transmission via an environmental reservoir of M. bovis is generally perceived not to be a significant source for infection. Here, we report on the application of molecular technology (PCR) to quantify the prevalence of M. bovis in the environment and to explore its epidemiological significance. We show that the detectability of viable M. bovis at badger setts and latrines is strongly linked to the frequency of M. bovis excretion by infected badgers, and that putative M. bovis in the environment is prevalent on a large proportion of endemic cattle farms in Britain. These results raise important questions about the role of an environmental reservoir in bTB persistence.

Original publication

DOI

10.1098/rsbl.2006.0468

Type

Journal article

Journal

Biol Lett

Publication Date

22/09/2006

Volume

2

Pages

460 - 462

Keywords

Animals, Cattle, Disease Reservoirs, Environment, Likelihood Functions, Models, Statistical, Mycobacterium bovis, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Soil Microbiology, Tuberculosis, Bovine