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Plant growth and proliferation control is coming into a global focus due to recent ecological and economical developments. Plants represent not only the largest food supply for mankind but also may serve as a global source of renewable energies. However, plant breeding has to accomplish a tremendous boost in yield to match the growing demand of a still rapidly increasing human population. Moreover, breeding has to adjust to changing environmental conditions, in particular increased drought. Regulation of cell-cycle control is a major determinant of plant growth and therefore an obvious target for plant breeding. Furthermore, cell-cycle control is also crucial for the DNA damage response, for instance upon irradiation. Thus, an in-depth understanding of plant cell-cycle regulation is of importance beyond a scientific point of view. The mere presence of many conserved core cell-cycle regulators, e.g. CDKs, cyclins, or CDK inhibitors, has formed the idea that the cell cycle in plants is exactly or at least very similarly controlled as in yeast or human cells. Here together with a recent publication we demonstrate that this dogma is not true and show that the control of entry into mitosis is fundamentally different in plants versus yeast or metazoans. Our findings build an important base for the understanding and ultimate modulation of plant growth not only during unperturbed but also under harsh environmental conditions.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Plant Signal Behav

Publication Date

12/2010

Volume

5

Pages

1613 - 1618

Keywords

Animals, Cell Cycle, DNA Damage, Plant Cells, Yeasts, cdc25 Phosphatases