Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The hypoxic response in humans is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF), for which prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) act as oxygen-sensing components. The evolutionary origins of the HIF system have been previously unclear. We demonstrate a functional HIF system in the simplest animal, Trichoplax adhaerens: HIF targets in T. adhaerens include glycolytic and metabolic enzymes, suggesting a role for HIF in the adaptation of basal multicellular animals to fluctuating oxygen levels. Characterization of the T. adhaerens PHDs and cross-species complementation assays reveal a conserved oxygen-sensing mechanism. Cross-genomic analyses rationalize the relative importance of HIF system components, and imply that the HIF system is likely to be present in all animals, but is unique to this kingdom.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/embor.2010.170

Type

Journal article

Journal

EMBO Rep

Publication Date

01/2011

Volume

12

Pages

63 - 70

Keywords

Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, Molecular Sequence Data, Oxygen, Phylogeny, Placozoa, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Transcriptional Activation, Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein