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"Naturally, we are delighted that this hugely successful doctoral training programme has been renewed. Its impact can be measured not only in the outstanding track record of the students, but also in how the programme has brought members of the Oxford Neuroscience community together"

Following a successful application, the Wellcome Trust 4 year doctoral programme in Neuroscience has been renewed in full. This will provide funding for 5 students each year from 2014-2018 inclusive. Students take the MSc in Neuroscience during their first year, which serves to provide them with a wide range of knowledge and practical skills, so that they can ask questions and tackle problems that transcend the traditional disciplines from which Neuroscience has evolved. The programme has been running since 1996 and nearly 80 students have now successfully graduated. Approximately 400 publications have so far resulted from the DPhil projects of the students, many in high impact journals including Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience and Neuron. Following completion, more than 80% of students have continued with science or science-related careers, often securing prestigious personal fellowships or positions on a grant. To date, 13 of the graduates from the programme have obtained tenured academic positions, leading their own laboratories, and several hold full professorships. Professor Andrew King, the programme Director commented "Naturally, we are delighted that this hugely successful doctoral training programme has been renewed. Its impact can be measured not only in the outstanding track record of the students, but also in how the programme has brought members of the Oxford Neuroscience community together". The University has committed to expand the cohort size by funding one additional 4-year studentship per each year, increasing the number of students admitted to 6 per annum.