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The University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry is working with partners to develop and lead The Young People’s Campaign for the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health and Sustainable Development

A Summit which brought together policymakers from around the world to discuss the strategy for encouraging progress and equality in global mental health took place in London (9th & 10th October 2018).
To watch the Summit

 

Professor Ilina Singh, Professor of Neuroscience & Society, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford and Commissioner at the Summit, said, "This is an exceptional campaign for young people to help support mental health. I'm really proud of the work my team has done in researching and promoting this important issue, helping to highlight both ways to prevent and the treatments available for mental health disorders. We hope the materials and information in the campaign will be used far and wide to support young people."

 

Extract from the Executive Summary: 

'A Lancet Commission aims to seize the opportunity offered by the Sustainable Development Goals to consider future directions for global mental health. The Commission proposes that the global mental agenda should be expanded from a focus on reducing the treatment gap to improving the mental health of whole populations and reducing the global burden of mental disorders by addressing gaps in prevention and quality of care. The Commission outlines a blueprint for action to promote mental wellbeing, prevent mental health problems, and enable recovery from mental disorders.'

To view the full report.

To learn more about the Global Mental Health Commission.

Professor Singh adds, “We are working with a global group of 15 Young Leaders for Global Mental Health. This group of young influencers will help us identify and develop relevant research and engagement projects well into the future.” 

The work is led by Dr Gabriela Pavarini, working with Dr Alexandra Almeida, Jessica Lorimer and other team members at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford. The Campaign is supported by funding from the Wellcome Trust.

One of the Young Leaders makes a compelling and inspirational presentation in the Summit, to view: Grace Gatera from Rwanda, and to follow it on the instagram feed #mymindourhumanity.


To see and join the Campaign on Instagram and Facebook:  

#mymindourhumanity; and #theworldneeds 

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