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The International Public Policy Observatory's (IPPO) Rapid Evidence Review has now been released. Co-authored by Cathy Creswell, the Review was commissioned by the UK Department for Education following a recommendation from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE). It synthesises the research evidence from 32 studies on harms relating to the impact of lockdown and school closures on UK parents and carers, and aims to address what specific harms have parents and carers experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic and what potential mitigating factors may reduce the impact of these harms. 

The review concludes that parents and carers have been disproportionately affected by school-closures with research evidence showing increases in mental health problems, financial struggles - including impacts on employability in specific sectors - and an increased risk of domestic violence within the home. Existing gender inequalities and stereotypical gender roles in divisions of unpaid care work may have put women at a greater risk of poor mental health and loss of earnings. Mothers, single parents, ethnic minorities, parents with lower SES and/or parents with SEN/ND children should be especially targeted for interventions.

Cathy Creswell  said: 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought substantial challenges for parents and carers of children and young people. Our review has highlighted the negative impacts on parents and carers both economically  and in terms of their mental health, particularly for families who already faced disadvantages. Support for parents and carers will be critical as they face ongoing disruption and to support recovery beyond the pandemic.

 

Further information

Read the full report

The Review's authors were: Dr Hope Christie (Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Edinburgh), Dr Lucy V Hiscox (Department of Psychology, University of Bath), Professor Cathy Creswell (Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford), Professor Sarah L Halligan (Department of Psychology, University of Bath). These authors were supported by review specialists Carol Vigurs and Dr Bridget Candy (EPPI-Centre).

The work was undertaken under the umbrella of the ESRC-funded International Public Policy Observatory (IPPO) and managed by the EPPI Centre, a specialist centre in the UCL Social Research Institute

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