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Researchers from Department of Experimental Psychology have found that, during lockdown, teenagers mental health is struggling compared to their parents.

The Oxford ARC study, launched in May, has found that teenagers consistently report higher levels of anxiety and depression than parents. Around 35% of teenagers are saying they feel lonely often or most of the time, compared to 17% of parents. At the same time, about 40% of parents say they never feel lonely, compared to only 20% of teenagers. Since May, teenagers consistently reported that they felt unable to control the important things in life, with rates as high as 60% last month.

Now, millions of teenagers are returning to school. Far from being a typical return to school after summer break, this year’s students will bring with them unique experiences, worries, and traumas from lockdown during this global pandemic lockdown.

The Oxford ARC study, is launching a new phase of research in order to understand how certain aspects of the school experience are helping or harming young people’s mental health during the transition back to school and into the ‘new normal’. Teenagers interested in taking part can go to the Oxford ARC website to find out more.

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

This story is also discussed in a Department of Experimental Psychology blog

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