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The app, SlowMo, was designed jointly by researchers, including Dr Mar Rus-Calafell and Professor Daniel Freeman, service users, healthcare designers and clinicians. It is currently being trialed in several NHS Trusts across the country.

Find out more and watch Angie's story (Department of Psychiatry website)

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