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The European Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MS group (MAGNIMS) consists of nine different centres, collaborating on research and expert guidelines in the field. 

Our Neuromyelitis Optica and Multiple Sclerosis teams hosted a very successful 37th meeting of the MAGNIMS group at Wolfson College Oxford in May 2022, which marked 20 years of this collaboration. Sponsorship from UCB, Roche and Alexion made it possible.

The workshop topic was 'Identifying imaging features of MOG Antibody Disease (MOGAD) and differentiating it from MS : towards producing MOGAD imaging criteria'. This fits in with Oxford's highly specialised expertise in MOGAD and Neuromyelitis Optica. Experts in pathology and neuroimmunology as well as imaging participated, with speakers from Europe and the US. A review publication from the workshop is now planned.

The meeting was fully subscribed with 80 in-person participants and 30 people joining online. Ruth Geraldes and Silvia Messina provided a punting lesson for delegates. A celebratory cake included a model brain, although the two pathologists were not impressed!  

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