Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The neuroanatomical correlates of depression remain unclear. Functional imaging data have associated depression with abnormal patterns of activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC), including the ventromedial (vmPFC) and dorsolateral (dlPFC) sectors. If vmPFC and dlPFC are critical neural substrates for the pathogenesis of depression, then damage to either area should affect the expression of depressive symptoms. Using patients with brain lesions we show that, relative to nonfrontal lesions, bilateral vmPFC lesions are associated with markedly low levels of depression, whereas bilateral dorsal PFC lesions (involving dorsomedial and dorsolateral areas in both hemispheres) are associated with substantially higher levels of depression. These findings demonstrate that vmPFC and dorsal PFC are critically and causally involved in depression, although with very different roles: vmPFC damage confers resistance to depression, whereas dorsal PFC damage confers vulnerability.

Original publication

DOI

10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2324-08.2008

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Neurosci

Publication Date

19/11/2008

Volume

28

Pages

12341 - 12348

Keywords

Adult, Brain Injuries, Brain Mapping, Cognition Disorders, Depression, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Movement Disorders, Prefrontal Cortex, Severity of Illness Index, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Veterans