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Centrosomes and cilia are organized by a centriole pair comprising an older mother and a younger daughter. Centriole numbers are tightly regulated, and daughter centrioles (which assemble in S phase) cannot themselves duplicate or organize centrosomes until they have passed through mitosis. It is unclear how this mitotic "centriole conversion" is regulated, but it requires Plk1/Polo kinase. Here we show that in flies, Cdk1 phosphorylates the conserved centriole protein Sas-4 during mitosis. This creates a Polo-docking site that helps recruit Polo to daughter centrioles and is required for the subsequent recruitment of Asterless (Asl), a protein essential for centriole duplication and mitotic centrosome assembly. Point mutations in Sas-4 that prevent Cdk1 phosphorylation or Polo docking do not block centriole disengagement during mitosis, but block efficient centriole conversion and lead to embryonic lethality. These observations can explain why daughter centrioles have to pass through mitosis before they can duplicate and organize a centrosome.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.devcel.2016.05.022

Type

Journal article

Journal

Dev Cell

Publication Date

20/06/2016

Volume

37

Pages

545 - 557

Keywords

Amino Acid Motifs, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, CDC2 Protein Kinase, Centrioles, Centrosome, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Embryonic Development, Mitosis, Models, Biological, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Threonine