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BACKGROUND: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors represent an entirely novel treatment option for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). As such they represent a significant change in practice and a significant cost pressure on funding bodies. OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of cholinesterase inhibitors on routine clinical practice. METHODS: We estimated potential demand for the compounds taking into account eligibility criteria and prescribing practice agreed between clinicians and funders. We then audited actual prescribing practice assessing whether the estimated demand matched actual demand and whether practice and prescribing criteria were adhered to. RESULTS: Over a two-year period we estimated the demand for treatment at a total of 89 patient years for the population of the audit unit. In practice only 24.5 patient years of therapy were received, the short fall apparently being due to low referral rates for treatment. Prescribing by clinicians matched practice guidelines and a high proportion of three monthly assessments using scales for cognition, function and global state were performed. Using these assessment procedures treatment successes could be differentiated from primary and secondary treatment failures and, where apparently appropriate, treatment could be stopped. CONCLUSION: In the real world of clinical practice demand for treatment in AD is modest but likely to grow and assessment with an aim to identifying those receiving benefit from treatment can be achieved.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Int J Geriatr Psychiatry

Publication Date

12/2001

Volume

16

Pages

1136 - 1142

Keywords

Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Cholinesterase Inhibitors, Costs and Cost Analysis, Critical Pathways, Drug Costs, Drug Monitoring, England, Female, Humans, Male, Medical Audit, Mental Status Schedule, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Referral and Consultation