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The objective of this study was to examine agreement between self-reported and medically recorded self-harm, and investigate whether the prevalence of self-harm differs in questionnaire responders vs. non-responders. A total of 4,810 participants from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) completed a self-harm questionnaire at age 16 years. Data from consenting participants were linked to medical records (number available for analyses ranges from 205-3,027). The prevalence of self-harm leading to hospital admission was somewhat higher in questionnaire non-responders than responders (2.0 vs. 1.2%). Hospital attendance with self-harm was under-reported on the questionnaire. One third reported self-harm inconsistently over time; inconsistent reporters were less likely to have depression and fewer had self-harmed with suicidal intent. Self-harm prevalence estimates derived from self-report may be underestimated; more accurate figures may come from combining data from multiple sources.

Original publication

DOI

10.1080/13811118.2015.1033121

Type

Journal article

Journal

Arch Suicide Res

Publication Date

2016

Volume

20

Pages

113 - 141

Keywords

ALSPAC, agreement, consistency, data linkage, self-harm, suicide attempt, Adolescent, Depression, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Information Storage and Retrieval, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Prevalence, Self Report, Self-Injurious Behavior, Suicidal Ideation, Suicide, Attempted, Surveys and Questionnaires, United Kingdom