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© Cambridge University Press 2014. Mental health care in the second half of the 20th century in much of the developed world has been dominated by the move out from large asylums. Both in response to this move and to make it possible, a pattern of care has evolved which is most commonly referred to as 'Community Psychiatry'. This narrative review describes this process, from local experimentation into the current era of evidence-based mental health care. It focuses on three main areas of this development: (i) the reprovision of care for those discharged during deinstitutionalisation; (ii) the evolution and evaluation of its characteristic feature the Community Mental Health Team; and (iii) the increasing sophistication of psychosocial interventions developed to support patients. It finishes with an overview of some current challenges.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/S2045796014000560

Type

Journal article

Journal

Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences

Publication Date

01/01/2014

Volume

23

Pages

337 - 344