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The segmented genome of an influenza virus is encapsidated into ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). Unusually among RNA viruses, influenza viruses replicate in the nucleus of an infected cell, and their RNPs must therefore recruit host factors to ensure transport across a number of cellular compartments during the course of an infection. Recent studies have shed new light on many of these processes, including the regulation of nuclear export, genome packaging, mechanisms of virion assembly and viral entry and, in particular, the identification of Rab11 on recycling endosomes as a key mediator of RNP transport and genome assembly. This review uses these recent gains in understanding to describe in detail the journey of an influenza A virus RNP from its synthesis in the nucleus through to its entry into the nucleus of a new host cell.

Original publication

DOI

10.3390/v5102424

Type

Journal article

Journal

Viruses

Publication Date

02/10/2013

Volume

5

Pages

2424 - 2446

Keywords

Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Animals, Cell Nucleus, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Orthomyxoviridae, Orthomyxoviridae Infections, Ribonucleoproteins, Virus Replication