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This study evaluated mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), a group intervention designed to train recovered recurrently depressed patients to disengage from dysphoria-activated depressogenic thinking that may mediate relapse/recurrence. Recovered recurrently depressed patients (n = 145) were randomized to continue with treatment as usual or, in addition, to receive MBCT. Relapse/recurrence to major depression was assessed over a 60-week study period. For patients with 3 or more previous episodes of depression (77% of the sample), MBCT significantly reduced risk of relapse/recurrence. For patients with only 2 previous episodes, MBCT did not reduce relapse/recurrence. MBCT offers a promising cost-efficient psychological approach to preventing relapse/recurrence in recovered recurrently depressed patients.

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Consult Clin Psychol

Publication Date

08/2000

Volume

68

Pages

615 - 623

Keywords

Adult, Antidepressive Agents, Cognitive Therapy, Combined Modality Therapy, Depressive Disorder, Major, England, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Ontario, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Secondary Prevention, Survival Analysis, Thinking