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Gray has drawn upon genetic evidence to argue for the existence of rodent emotionality, a model of human neuroticism. With the advent of molecular mapping techniques it has become possible to test this hypothesis. Here I review the progress that has been made, largely in animal genetic studies, demonstrating that a common set of genes act pleiotropically on measures of emotionality. More recently, evidence has emerged supporting the view that the same genes influence variation in both rodent and human phenotypes.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.neubiorev.2004.01.004

Type

Journal article

Journal

Neurosci Biobehav Rev

Publication Date

05/2004

Volume

28

Pages

307 - 316

Keywords

Animals, Behavior, Animal, Chromosome Mapping, Disease Models, Animal, Emotions, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Neurotic Disorders, Species Specificity