Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Few studies have investigated the extent to which psychosocial/psychological factors are associated with the prediction of deliberate self-harm (DSH) among adolescents. In this study, 737 pupils aged 15-16 years completed a lifestyle and coping survey at time one and 500 were followed up six months later. Six point two percent of the respondents (n = 31) reported an act of DSH between Time 1 and Time 2. In multivariate analyses, worries about sexual orientation, history of sexual abuse, family DSH, anxiety, and self-esteem were associated with repeat DSH during the course of the study, but history of sexual abuse was the only factor predictive of first-time DSH. The findings suggest that school-based programs focused on how young people cope with psychosocial stressors may offer promise.

Original publication

DOI

10.1521/suli.2009.39.4.364

Type

Journal article

Journal

Suicide Life Threat Behav

Publication Date

08/2009

Volume

39

Pages

364 - 375

Keywords

Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Child Abuse, Sexual, Female, Humans, Life Style, Logistic Models, Male, Mass Screening, Multivariate Analysis, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Scotland, Self-Injurious Behavior, Surveys and Questionnaires