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To: (1) estimate the prevalence of clinically significant emotional distress in patients attending a cancer outpatient department and (2) determine the associations between distress and demographic and clinical variables, we conducted a survey of outpatients attending selected clinics of a regional cancer centre in Edinburgh, UK. Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on touch-screen computers and the scores were linked to clinical variables on the hospital database. Nearly one quarter of the cancer outpatients 674 out of 3071 (22%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 20-23%) met our criterion for clinically significant emotional distress (total HADS score 15 or more). Univariate analysis identified the following statistically significant associations: age<65, female gender, cancer type and extent of disease. Multivariate analysis indicated that age<65 (odds ratio 1.41; 95% CI 1.18-1.69), female gender (odds ratio 1.58; 95% CI 1.31-1.92) and active disease (odds ratio 1.72; 95% CI 1.43-2.05) but not cancer diagnosis, were the independent predictors of clinically significant emotional distress. Services to treat distress in cancer patients should be organised to target patients by characteristics other than their cancer diagnosis.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/sj.bjc.6603626

Type

Journal article

Journal

Br J Cancer

Publication Date

26/03/2007

Volume

96

Pages

868 - 874

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anxiety, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Outpatients, Prevalence, Stress, Psychological, United Kingdom