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Patients, carers and advocates say better evidence is needed on the safety of ketamine for depression after long-term use, and that those prescribed it must be closely monitored.

A study undertaken as part of a collaboration between the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) and NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), Exploring patients'and carers' views about the clinical use of ketamine to inform policy and practical decisions: mixed-methods study, was published on 30 July in the Royal College of Psychiatrists' BJPsych Open.

The study explored attitudes among four groups: people considering ketamine as an antidepressant, people who have already used ketamine for depression, people with experience of illegal drug use and addiction, and patient advocates and carers. 44 people took part in 21 focus groups, and an online survey captured the views of patients, carers and advocates during a consultation day.

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